Cyberghost VPN Review

Published by Jesse Afolabi on

cyberghost


Earlier we covered our recommended list of VPNs for Chrome OS of which we will subsequently bring you a review of the respective VPN platforms. In the light of that promise, here’s is our review of Cyberghost.

Cyberghost is made available to Chrome OS technically via three distinctive channels with what is unfortunately a lackluster experience irrespective of the route you decide to take.

Cyberghost is a VPN provider based in Romania with a quite respectable track record. The service prides itself in its offering of a military grade 256-bit AES encryption and OpenVPN (together with the provision of optional tunneling protocols that include IPSec, and L2TP).

Primary advantages of Cyberghost include:

Ease of use

Cyberghost has (dare I say) a damn simple interface with all the features and setting neatly tucked in the hamburger menu with optional connectivity options and settings only a left swipe away.

Relative affordability

Cyberghost has one of the cheapest plans available on any platform and the only VPN provider that comes close in that respect is NordVPN. The service currently has some ongoing sale on their website. More specifically, at the time of this writing, they have a 77% discount on their 3 year plan billed at $99.

P2P support

Torrenting is one area some VPNs especially those within the 14 eyes tend to avoid completely, however, since Cyberghost is outside the 14 eyes, they are not bound by the restrictions that supposedly come with being a VPN service provider within this jurisdiction. It is for this reason they are able to offer a no-log policy as well as a competitive and rock-solid P2P support with a kill switch to boot.

Disadvantages

There’s no distressing con to highlight with the usage of Cyberghost asides the fact that it’s not the best overall particularly in the area of speed. That credit would go to Express VPN but of course with a marked up subscription fee.

Installation

Chrome OS offers three options in setting up Cyberghost. These include the Chrome Web Store, Google Play Store, and Chrome OS’s inbuilt VPN wizard of which you will find the instructions here.

Android set up

The set up of the Android app is foolproof and requires no fiddling about. Once downloaded, visit the hamburger menu and proceed to the login screen (which requires a premium account) and select your preferred connectivity option from the app’s front page.

Personal experience

Having had Cyberghost set up on my PC, I proceeded to installing it on my Pixelbook and smartphone. In my personal experience, I found the Android client to be lacking in some respect. I had difficulties staying connected to some public networks especially on the Pixelbook. There’s also no predefined P2P file sharing option as it’s available on the WIndows and Mac OS client.

Cyberghost
Cyberghost connection screen

Having found the Android app to be somewhat lacking, I then proceeded to try the alternative L2TP setup – which, by the way, is the recommended route for Chrome OS. I had no success getting Cyberghost’s L2TP protocol set up as it failed to connect multiple times. 

Verdict

According to several reviews online, Cyberghost still struggles to provide a unified experience across the platforms it supports. This, of course, doesn’t imply my suggesting that you’re bound to have an experience such as mine. If anything at all, your mileage will most likely vary. Additionally, while I haven’t had the most success with their L2TP protocol, some other Chromebook users have.

Despite all these shortcomings, Cyberghost still manages to deliver on its primary functionalities as a VPN and has our recommendation due to a balanced combination of features with incredible pricing to boot – which as at the time of this writing ranges from their $2.75 deal for a 3-year plan, $3.69 for a 2-year plan to their $12.99 plan.

Have you tried Cyberghost in the past? How was your experience and how does it compare to other VPNs you might have tried in the past? Let us know in the comments.


Jesse Afolabi

Having been a technical writer for over 4 years, and co-founded Fossmint.com in 2016, I took my passion to the next level with the founding of Itschromeos.com which so happens to revolve around my love for open-source technologies and Chrome OS. It's my hope to venture into new avenues in the tech universe and take you with me on that ride.

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